Equipment Recommendations

The AERO coaches get asked all the time about equipment recommendations, and we all certainly have our preferences so we have compiled a list for parents to use. The word of caution is that this list is just our opinions and is not meant to be a strict list of models/types/brands/etc. It is just a guide. If you have questions about a particular product do not hesitate to contact your coach and they will be happy to walk you through any decisions to ensure you are getting the right product that is appropriate for your child and is within your budget.

Swim Equipment

  • Fins

    • Finis/TYR/Sporti Floating Swim Fins ($18)
  • Goggles

    • Speedo Vanquisher 2.0 Junior – most in my family wear these, even Coach Jeff ($17)
    • Speedo Vanquisher 2.0 ($17)
    • Clear or light tint for indoors and mirrored are good if you are going to be doing open water
  • Pull Buoy

    • Tyr or Sporti Jr. Pull Float Buoy ($6)
    • Tyr or Sporti Pull Float Buoy ($6)
    • Depends on size/age/weight but I would say most use the Jr.
  • Wetsuits

    • Most wetsuits made for triathlon swimming will do. Follow the manufacturer’s recommendation on sizing. Most get a full wetsuit.
    • Xterra Vortex wetsuits can be had a very reasonable price (Around $100)
  • Misc

    • Bungee Straps for goggles are nice ($3)

Bike Equipment

  • Helmets

    • Bell Sweep – favorite of a lot of cycling clubs and economical ($50)
    • Giro Air Attack – If you are looking for an economical road/aero helmet ($130)
    • Specialized Evade – if you are looking for a little better aerodynamics ($225)
  • Clipless Pedals

    • Entry level – Look Keo Easy ($40)
    • Entry level – Shimano R540 SPD SL Light Action ($40)
    • Any Level – Speedplay Pedals ($115)
    • Any Level – Look Keo Blade 2 ($100)
    • Any Level – Shimano Ultegra Pedals ($90)
  • Cycling Shoes

    • Triathlon Cycling Shoes (typically have a loop on the back for ease of entry during races)
    • Shimano TR32 are common amongst triathletes ($70)
    • Pearl Izumi Tri Fly ($70)
  • Bikes (No aero bars or ‘triathlon’ bikes are allowed)

    • Junior (Small)
      • Felt F24 ($700)
    • Junior (Large) / Senior (Small)
      • Felt F95 Jr. ($800)
      • Specialized Allez 650 ($770)
    • Senior (Elite)
      • Specialized Tarmac
      • Specialized Amira (womens version of the tarmac)
      • Trek Madone (mens and womens versions)
    • Bike Sizing (use with caution as different brands have different sizing)
      • 44cm – 4’8” – 4’10”
      • 48cm – 5’0” – 5’3”
      • 50cm – 5’2”-5’5”
      • 52cm – 5’5”-5’8”
      • 54cm – 5’8”-5’10”
    • Bike Trainers

      • Basic
        • Kurt Kinetic Road Machine – Fluid ($350)
        • Cycleops Fluid Trainer ($280)
      • Smart Trainer (these are becoming popular and can interface with computer apps, which may be coming down the road in Aero)
        • Wahoo Kickr Snap ($600)
      • Bike Speedometer/Computers
        • I would recommend all ages get speed and cadence computers if possible. The cadence data is very important for learning proper pedaling technique.
        • Garmin Edge 520 (or you can get used ones of the 500 for around $100). This is the most flexible as it will read power data and is compatible with Zwift accessories, see below. The computer GPS will give you speed outdoors, but I would recommend you couple that with a Garmin Speed and Cadence Sensor which will give you Cadence and speed on an indoor trainer (I prefer the wireless and magnetless versions) ($300)
        • Garmin Magnetless Speed and Cadence Sensor ($60)
        • Budget – Cateye Strada Cadence (this one has wires you have to deal with) ($45)
        • Cateye Strada Double Wireless (no wires) ($80)
      • Zwift Setup
        • Zwift is on online gaming app that you use on your bike trainer. This is one of those things that other HPT teams are using and is in the Beta stages at AERO. Stay tuned, but if you want to get a head start.
        • Zwift Budget Set Up
          • Any trainer
          • Speed Sensor with Ant+ (I am liking the new magnet-less sensors like Garmin Edge Speed sensor. You can also get a speed and cadence sensor for not that much more
          • CPU with a decent graphics card
          • Ant+ dongle (this lets your computer get data from your Ant+ sensor)
        • Zwift Advanced Set Up
          • Smart Trainer (see above, like Wahoo Kickr Snap)
          • CPU with a decent graphics card
          • Ant+ dongle (this lets your computer get data from your Ant+ sensor)
      • Aero Wheels
        • All aero/carbon wheels MUST be on the Approved Wheel List on https://draftlegalrules.com . Just keep in mind that aero wheels come in two categories: Tubular and Clincher. Tubular rims utilize tubular tires that do not have tubes like typical road bike rims, but require tires to be glued (or taped) directly to the rim. They are lighter than Clincher rims but require some extra work/skill mounting tires and replacing tires if needed. Clincher rims utilize tubes/tires like a normal road bike. They are heavier but changing tires is easier. I personally own Tubulars. The other thing you must know is whether your bike is compatible with the rims. Typically road bikes come setup as a 10-speed or an 11-speed and this makes a difference on compatibility of rims. The speeds can be checked by counting the cogs on the rear wheel.
        • Used – I have bought used rims online, but as with anything this is a buyer beware sort of thing and comes with risks or worn hubs, rims being out of true, etc. At any rate the following are rims you can typically find.
          • Zipp 404 (Zipps have been around for twenty years so if buying used it can be a bit difficult to determine the age. I would recommend sticking to the Firecrest rims which have a characteristic ‘dimpled’ surface and were released about 5 years ago)
          • Easton EC90 Aero (Can be found for reasonable price, typically fit only 10-speeds without modifications)
          • HED Stinger 6
          • Roval Rapide CLX60
          • Profile Design TwentyFour 58

Running

  • Watch

    • GPS watches are good for those athletes that have been running for a while and have a good feel for running form and the maturity to process this sort of data. We do not recommend them for new runners or most juniors as they should be concentrating less on data, not more. That being said there are some great watches that I really like
      • Basic GPS (speed and distance and some you can pair with heart rate monitor)
        • TomTom Runner/Spark ($100)
        • Garmin 10/15/25/35 ($100)
      • Advanced (I really like the watches that have come out with optical HR monitor in the watch. Allows the easiest and most convenient tracking of HR and whole lot of other features like cadence, etc)
        • Garmin Vivoactive HR ($220)
        • Tom Tom Spark Cardio ($200)
  • Shoes

    • Youth Sizes
      • Brooks Pureflow
      • Mizuno Wave Rider Junior
      • Nike Free
    • Adult Sizes (lots of options/preferences here)  Highly variable but for HP team plan to have 2 pairs of shoes, one for most training (more support) and one for racing (less support).  I’m lovin the ONs (find them at Nashville Running Company and online).
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